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Ear Infection Research - Precautions and Warnings With Scopolamine Patch

This page contains links to eMedTV Ear Articles containing information on subjects from Ear Infection Research to Precautions and Warnings With Scopolamine Patch. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Ear Infection Research
    Perhaps the most important area of ear infection research involves the search for a vaccine. This eMedTV article describes other research that is being conducted to increase our understanding of how to treat, diagnose, and prevent ear infections.
  • Ear Infection Symptoms
    Common ear infection symptoms may include fever, earache, ear pain, hearing loss, and dizziness. This eMedTV resource explains how ear infections occur and describes the symptoms that may occur in children and adults.
  • Ear Infection Treatment
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, antibiotics are often prescribed to treat ear infections. This article also discusses other treatment options, which may include surgery in certain circumstances.
  • Ear Infections and School or Daycare
    Some schools will require a doctor's note to give your child medication for an ear infection. This eMedTV Web page offers information about how to handle ear infections and school or daycare.
  • Ear Infections in Children
    As this eMedTV segment explains, children typically get more ear infections than adults. This article explains why children are more prone to develop these infections. Also discussed are causes, symptoms, and treatment of ear infections.
  • Floxin Drops for Perforated Tympanic Eardrum
    This eMedTV page explains that if you have a middle ear infection and a perforated tympanic membrane (eardrum), Floxin Otic ear drops may help treat your symptoms. This page describes this type of ear infection and explains how this ear drop may help.
  • Floxin Ear
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Floxin Otic is an ear drop used for treating certain bacterial infections, including otitis media and otitis externa. This article takes a closer look at specific uses, how this drug works, and general dosing tips.
  • Floxin Ear Drop Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, Floxin Otic is a prescription antibiotic used for treating certain bacterial ear infections. This page offers important information on Floxin Otic, including specific uses of this ear drop, side effects, and dosing tips.
  • Floxin Otic
    Floxin Otic is a medicine prescribed to treat certain bacterial infections of the ear. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this antibiotic ear drop, including specific uses, details on how it works, potential side effects, and dosing tips.
  • Floxin Otic 0.3%
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Floxin Otic to treat certain bacterial infections of the ear. This eMedTV article briefly explains when and how to use Floxin Otic 0.3% multi-dose containers, including why it is important to finish your entire course.
  • Floxin Otic and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Floxin Otic (ofloxacin otic solution) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV Web article explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding while using Floxin Otic, and why problems are unlikely.
  • Floxin Otic and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use Floxin Otic (ofloxacin otic solution) if you are expecting. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes the results of animal studies and explains why the FDA classifies Floxin Otic as a pregnancy Category C medication.
  • Floxin Otic Dosage
    Your dose of Floxin Otic will depend on your age and the type of infection being treated. This eMedTV resource discusses specific dosing guidelines for treating various ear infections. A list of important tips for using this ear drop is also provided.
  • Floxin Otic Drops
    Available by prescription only, Floxin Otic is used to treat certain types of ear infections. This eMedTV segment further discusses these ear drops, including Floxin Otic's specific uses, dosing guidelines, and details on how the medicine works.
  • Floxin Otic Drug Interactions
    Currently, there are no known drug interactions with Floxin Otic. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it is possible that not all interactions are known at this time, so tell your doctor about all medications you are taking before using Floxin Otic.
  • Floxin Otic Overdose
    If you use too much Floxin Otic (ofloxacin otic solution), you may have ear burning and discomfort. This eMedTV Web resource describes what to expect with an overdose, including information on how a doctor may treat any problems that occur.
  • Floxin Otic Side Effects
    In clinical trials, ear discomfort and a bitter taste were some of the most common Floxin Otic side effects. This eMedTV page lists other possible reactions to this ear drop, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Floxin Otic Solution
    Available by prescription, Floxin Otic solution is used to treat certain types of bacterial ear infections. This eMedTV segment further explores this ear medication, including specific uses, dosing guidelines, and details on how the ear drops work.
  • Floxin Otic Uses
    Floxin Otic is prescribed for treating certain ear infections in adults and children. This eMedTV page further describes specific uses for Floxin Otic, including "swimmer's ear" and middle ear infections. This page also explains how this ear drop works.
  • Floxin Otic Warnings and Precautions
    Using Floxin Otic may lead to certain allergic reactions, such as hives or wheezing. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Floxin Otic, including details on who should not use this drug.
  • Generic Augmentin ES
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Augmentin ES (amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium ES) is currently available. This article lists the manufacturers and explains how the FDA has determined that the generic versions are equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Cetraxal
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Cetraxal (ciprofloxacin ear drops) is sold as a brand-name drug only. This resource looks at why no generic Cetraxal is available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Cipro HC
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Cipro HC is currently unavailable. The earliest date a generic version could be produced is June 2015, although certain circumstances could change this. In addition, Cipro HC and Ciprodex are not the same thing.
  • Generic Ciprodex
    As this eMedTV page discusses, no generic Ciprodex (ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone) products are available. This page explains when a generic version might become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Floxin Otic
    As this eMedTV page explains, only generic versions of Floxin Otic (ofloxacin otic solution) are available at this time, as the brand-name product is no longer made. This article also explains whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Meclizine
    Both prescription and over-the-counter meclizine products are available in generic form. This page from the eMedTV library lists the various forms and strengths that are currently available for the generic versions of meclizine.
  • Generic Scopolamine
    As this part of the eMedTV Web library explains, there are no generic scopolamine patches available at this time. This article explains why this is the case. It also provides a link to more detailed information on this medicated skin patch.
  • Is There a Generic Ciprodex Otic?
    At this time, there is no generic Ciprodex otic suspension available. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains why there is not a generic version of this ear drop available and discusses when a generic product might be manufactured.
  • Meclazine
    Meclizine is a medication approved for treating motion sickness and vertigo. This eMedTV segment describes meclizine products in more detail and explains how often this drug is typically taken per day. Meclazine is a common misspelling of meclizine.
  • Meclazine HCL
    Meclizine is an antihistamine often used for treating vertigo and motion sickness. This eMedTV segment explores the effects of meclizine and lists possible side effects of the drug. Meclazine HCl is a common variation and misspelling of meclizine.
  • Meclezine
    The antihistamine meclizine is licensed to treat motion sickness and vertigo. This eMedTV Web page discusses the differences between prescription and non-prescription meclizine products. Meclezine is a common misspelling of meclizine.
  • Meclizene
    Meclizine products, available over the counter and by prescription, are used to treat motion sickness. This eMedTV article discusses other meclizine uses and describes how this medication works. Meclizene is a common misspelling of meclizine.
  • Meclizine
    Meclizine is an antihistamine drug commonly used for treating motion sickness and vertigo. This eMedTV Web page describes how the product works, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Meclizine 12.5 mg Tablets
    Non-prescription meclizine only comes in 25 mg tablets; the prescription form comes in several strengths. As this eMedTV page explains, there are three strengths available for prescription meclizine tablets (12.5 mg, 25 mg tablets, and 50 mg).
  • Meclizine 25 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, the standard non-prescription dosage for treating motion sickness is one or two meclizine tablets (25 mg to 50 mg) once daily. This article also offers information on how dosing works for prescription meclizine products.
  • Meclizine 50 mg Tablets
    There are three strengths available for prescription meclizine tablets; 50 mg is the highest strength. This eMedTV Web page provides meclizine dosing guidelines for the treatment of motion sickness and vertigo (a spinning sensation).
  • Meclizine and Breastfeeding
    The full risks of breastfeeding while using meclizine are unknown at this time. As this eMedTV article explains, it is not known if the drug passes through breast milk. Before using meclizine, nursing women should first consult their doctors.
  • Meclizine and Pregnancy
    Meclizine is generally considered to be safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at pregnancy and meclizine, and explains what problems occurred when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Meclizine Dosage
    The standard non-prescription dose of meclizine for treating motion sickness is one or two tablets daily. This eMedTV Web page also explains how dosing works for prescription meclizine products (for the treatment of both motion sickness and vertigo).
  • Meclizine for Children
    This eMedTV article discusses children and meclizine, explaining how the drug is not approved for use in younger children. As this segment explains, children as young as 12 may use this product. This article also covers what the medicine is used for.
  • Meclizine for Motion Sickness
    In order to help prevent motion sickness, meclizine should be taken one hour before embarkation. This eMedTV Web page describes how the product works for the treatment of motion sickness and explains how often this drug should be taken.
  • Meclizine for Vertigo
    For people with vertigo, meclizine may be a good choice for treating the spinning sensations. This eMedTV resource describes how meclizine works for the treatment of this condition and also covers other approved uses for this medication.
  • Meclizine HCI
    Some meclizine products are used to treat motion sickness; others are used for motion sickness and vertigo. This eMedTV article describes these different products in more detail. Meclizine HCi is a common variation and misspelling of meclizine.
  • Meclizine HCL Medication Information
    Meclizine is an antihistamine that is used to treat vertigo and motion sickness. This eMedTV segment offers more details on meclizine HCl, including information on how the medication is available both by prescription and over the counter.
  • Meclizine Hydrochloride (HCL)
    The antihistamine meclizine hydrochloride (HCl) is used for treating vertigo and motion sickness. This eMedTV segment describes various meclizine products and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting this medication.
  • Meclizine Oral
    An oral medication, meclizine is often taken to help alleviate motion sickness and vertigo. This eMedTV page covers meclizine uses in more detail, explains how often this drug is taken, and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Meclizine Overdose
    Taking an overdose of meclizine may cause symptoms such as dry mouth, drowsiness, or flushing. This eMedTV Web page explores other potential overdose symptoms and explains what steps a doctor may take to treat an overdose of this medication.
  • Meclizine Risks
    Meclizine may worsen high blood pressure and various other medical conditions. This eMedTV Web page explores other potential risks of meclizine products and lists some of the side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Meclizine Side Effects
    Potential side effects of meclizine include increased appetite, blurry vision, and nausea. This eMedTV page lists other side effects that may occur with this drug and explains which problems are potentially serious and may require medical attention.
  • Meclizine Tablets
    There are two different forms of meclizine (tablets and chewable tablets). This segment from the eMedTV library explains what this antihistamine medication is used for and lists the various strengths that are available for these meclizine products.
  • Meclizine Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, there are several approved uses for meclizine. Some products are used for treating motion sickness and vertigo (a spinning sensation), while others are only approved to treat and prevent motion sickness.
  • Meclozine
    Meclizine is a medicine that can help alleviate motion sickness and vertigo. This eMedTV page explores how the product works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting the drug. Meclozine is a common misspelling of meclizine.
  • Over-the-Counter Meclizine
    As this eMedTV resource explains, several conditions can be treated with meclizine. Over-the-counter versions of the drug are approved to treat motion sickness, while the prescription versions are licensed to treat motion sickness and vertigo.
  • Possible Problems With Meclizine
    As this article from the eMedTV site explains, as with any medication, side effects are possible with meclizine. Problems that have been reported with this drug include drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, and thickening of bronchial secretions.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Meclizine
    Meclizine can cause breathing problems in people with asthma. This eMedTV article describes other side effects or complications that may occur with this drug. Warnings and precautions on who should not use meclizine are also included in this article.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Scopolamine Patch
    You may develop seizures or problems urinating while using scopolamine patches. Other warnings are listed in this eMedTV resource, including precautions on how to use the scopolamine patch safely and how to minimize your risk of complications.
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